Getting rid of the duplicate JPEGs of raw files

I don’t know why I chose this option, but a few years ago when I moved from JPEG to shooting RAW, I decided to choose the RAW+JPEG option on my Nikon camera.   I guess I thought it would be handy having a lower resolution JPEG just in case I wanted to email it off or view it straight away on some device or software program that didn’t support Nikon raw files.

Well, it turns out, I never have used the JPEG.   I always do some post processing on my photos and if I wanted to blog or email or upload a photo, I’d always process the raw file (NEF) and then convert it to JPEG.  Plus I think most photo library or processing programs support raw files nowadays.

Unfortunately the workflow I used was to import both the JPEG and NEF files from my camera to my photo storage folder – resulting in 2 files for every photo.   No real problem right?

Well, for applications like Lightroom that are intelligent – no real problem, Lightroom knows that cameras can do this and if you have the right option turned on, it will treat the JPEG and NEF together as one – practically “hiding” the JPEG.

But for iPhoto, it’s not so clever so I ended up with two of every image.  And since the JPEG is slightly processed by the camera, they look different (different temperature, etc).   (Why do I use iPhoto too?  Because it’s the easiest way for my wifey and kids to see ALL our family photos, select them into albums, email them, etc).

Also it bugged me that I had all these JPEGs lying around on my hard disk, taking up space, slowing down my Lightroom and iPhoto libraries.  On my camera, I now use just RAW with no JPEG option.

So I started a project last week to get rid of these JPEGs.  But how?

After some messing around, I found these steps to work:

1) In Lightroom, turn on the option to treat the JPEG and RAW as separate photos.   This effectively turns Lightroom into the dumb iPhoto and you’ll end up seeing two photos now – one for the JPEG and one for the RAW.

2) In Finder (I use a Mac), I actually manually deleted all the JPEG’s that were duplicates of the RAW file.   I know – TEDIOUS!  I could have written a script to see if filenames were the same, if the raw file (NEF for my Nikon camera) existed, then delete the JPG.  But I was so paranoid that a script may just delete some required files that I decided to do this by hand instead.  In reality, with proper sorting of files, it didn’t take too long.

3) Now – I’m in a state where I’ve pulled the rug out from under the feet of iPhoto and Lightroom.  It’s time to get their databases back in a valid state.

4) For Lightroom, just go to the Library module, then right click on a folder and choose “Synchronize Folder…”.  This will prompt Lightroom to look at the folder and match them up – import any photos that are on disk but not in Lightroom, and remove any photos from Lightroom that are not on the disk anymore.

5) For iPhoto, unfortunately there is no synchronize option.   However, I did find a post on a blog called Phil at Warrimoo who posted an Applescript that walks through photos in iPhoto and deletes them from the iPhoto library if they don’t exist on disk.  It does work, although a little slowly and I had to tweak it to work for iPhoto libraries where the photos aren’t copied into the iPhoto library.

Hope this helps someone out there!

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2 thoughts on “Getting rid of the duplicate JPEGs of raw files”

    1. LinearFix – Thanks for the visit! Yep, you can do that too (but still have to “fix” up the other library – iPhoto or Lightroom). But I found it was much faster to use Finder or a Terminal command prompt to compare a large number of JPEGs and RAW files, then selecting all the JPEG files to delete than in Lightroom or iPhoto. YMMV 🙂

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