Category Archives: Photography

Perth Beach Wedding – Renae & Ywain

A few weeks ago, the gloomy weather in Perth decided to stay away, and the beautiful Spring sunshine arrived for Renae and Ywain’s wedding.   The weather was perfect – one of those days when you think to yourself “This is why I live in Perth!”   Renae & Ywain – thank you for letting me be part of your wedding day and capturing your love for each other!

The shoot started at the boy’s house.   It was also the day of the West Coast Eagles’ final in Melbourne, and this kept the boys entertained for a while!

We scooted quickly over to the Ocean Beach Hotel in Cottesloe where the girls were getting ready.  It was definitely beach weather with lots of people chilling at the OBH.  I just loved the amount of natural light streaming in through the windows that day.

Renae and Ywain had organised a 1958 Cadillac Fleetwood Limousine from JC Classic Automobiles.  According to the driver, John, it turns out that he bought and carefully and personally restored this American car as a labour of love!

After the wedding, the bridal party had a couple of hours to chill out and wander around the Surf Club and beach for photos.  Yes, we did get all the shoes off, but luckily no-one got too wet 🙂

There was an amazing sunset that day, so we just HAD to get back out on the beach one more time before the reception at the Surf Club.  I can’t believe how fortunate we were with the sky that evening.

The reception was held on the balcony of the City of Perth Surf Life Saving Club overlooking the beach where the celebrations continued!

ANCA WA Choral Festival Concert Photos

ANCA is the Australian National Choral Association – an organisation which aims to encourage and promote choral music and choirs in Australia.   The WA chapter has just been reformed and they had Choral Festival Day to mark this occasion.

No, this was not a “concert” – it was a festival where for a few hours, everyone first did a warm-up, then different choirs sang for each other and it all finished with a big “sing” – where everyone learnt a song together.

It was a fantastic session – the age range of participants ranged from Primary School to people in their 70’s-80’s!  So many choirs and people were interested attending that there weren’t enough seats in the venue!

I was there to take some snaps to document the day.  The hardest part was choosing the right time to click the shutter button as many of the items were quiet – so I had to time my shots with louder parts of songs, or right at the end just before or with the applause.  Maybe I need to investigate a mirror less camera body one day or some noise dampening for the Nikon D700 🙂

Here are some shots from the day!

PCCC Fundraising Concert Photos

A few months ago, I was asked to take some photos for a church fundraising concert.  It was great to see such a huge audience turnout for the concert, which unfortunately pushed me right to the backs and sides only.  However, there were many different acts so I was able to move around between items and get different angles.

The best part of the event was the last item where various ensembles all combined together!  It was wonderful to see the adult choir, childrens choir and orchestra all together.  Was it professional musical standard?  Of course not, these were all amateurs doing something for a good cause.  But what struck me was the gusto – the passion that they all had – well done to all!

Here are a few of my favourite shots from the day!

Only with the Nikon AF-D 50mm f/1.8

Wow, what a few weeks it’s been.

I’ve sold my Nikon D80, crop mid range zoom and wide angle zoom to fund an upgrade to a D700.

I absolutely LOVE the low light performance and robustness of the new camera body.

BUT…

I’ve lost a lot lens and focal length range!

So, on a recent family getaway, all I had was my 50mm.  At first I thought it was going to be very restrictive and I would not be able to get the shots I wanted, but in the end I think it’s been a very liberating experience!

No more having to play with 2 variables of distance to subject as well as zoom for viewing angle.  No big heavy zoom to lug around.  And I found having no zoom has FORCED me to be more creative in my shooting and composition.  I was very happy with the results and don’t think I missed out on too many shots where I needed a different focal length.   It forced me to think more about the shot and pre-visualise it instead of just standing on the spot and twisting the zoom ring.   And now it’s really made me think twice about whether I should get the 24-70 f/2.8 at all.

The only complaint about the Nikon AF-D 50mm 1.8 is that the bokeh can sometimes produce circles with quite a hard circumference line in conditions with spots of light coming through (like light through the leaves of a tree).  Besides that, it’s extremely good value and every Nikon shooter should have a 50mm!

Here are a few of my favourites from our trip away…

Getting rid of the duplicate JPEGs of raw files

I don’t know why I chose this option, but a few years ago when I moved from JPEG to shooting RAW, I decided to choose the RAW+JPEG option on my Nikon camera.   I guess I thought it would be handy having a lower resolution JPEG just in case I wanted to email it off or view it straight away on some device or software program that didn’t support Nikon raw files.

Well, it turns out, I never have used the JPEG.   I always do some post processing on my photos and if I wanted to blog or email or upload a photo, I’d always process the raw file (NEF) and then convert it to JPEG.  Plus I think most photo library or processing programs support raw files nowadays.

Unfortunately the workflow I used was to import both the JPEG and NEF files from my camera to my photo storage folder – resulting in 2 files for every photo.   No real problem right?

Well, for applications like Lightroom that are intelligent – no real problem, Lightroom knows that cameras can do this and if you have the right option turned on, it will treat the JPEG and NEF together as one – practically “hiding” the JPEG.

But for iPhoto, it’s not so clever so I ended up with two of every image.  And since the JPEG is slightly processed by the camera, they look different (different temperature, etc).   (Why do I use iPhoto too?  Because it’s the easiest way for my wifey and kids to see ALL our family photos, select them into albums, email them, etc).

Also it bugged me that I had all these JPEGs lying around on my hard disk, taking up space, slowing down my Lightroom and iPhoto libraries.  On my camera, I now use just RAW with no JPEG option.

So I started a project last week to get rid of these JPEGs.  But how?

After some messing around, I found these steps to work:

1) In Lightroom, turn on the option to treat the JPEG and RAW as separate photos.   This effectively turns Lightroom into the dumb iPhoto and you’ll end up seeing two photos now – one for the JPEG and one for the RAW.

2) In Finder (I use a Mac), I actually manually deleted all the JPEG’s that were duplicates of the RAW file.   I know – TEDIOUS!  I could have written a script to see if filenames were the same, if the raw file (NEF for my Nikon camera) existed, then delete the JPG.  But I was so paranoid that a script may just delete some required files that I decided to do this by hand instead.  In reality, with proper sorting of files, it didn’t take too long.

3) Now – I’m in a state where I’ve pulled the rug out from under the feet of iPhoto and Lightroom.  It’s time to get their databases back in a valid state.

4) For Lightroom, just go to the Library module, then right click on a folder and choose “Synchronize Folder…”.  This will prompt Lightroom to look at the folder and match them up – import any photos that are on disk but not in Lightroom, and remove any photos from Lightroom that are not on the disk anymore.

5) For iPhoto, unfortunately there is no synchronize option.   However, I did find a post on a blog called Phil at Warrimoo who posted an Applescript that walks through photos in iPhoto and deletes them from the iPhoto library if they don’t exist on disk.  It does work, although a little slowly and I had to tweak it to work for iPhoto libraries where the photos aren’t copied into the iPhoto library.

Hope this helps someone out there!

Perth Lindy Exchange and the D700

Last weekend, the Perth Swing Dance Society held its annual Lindyhop Exchange – called Hullabaloo!  It’s a fantastic long weekend of swing dancing, classes and social get togethers.  People from all over Australia come to Perth to socialise and dance!

Unfortunately, wifey and I don’t do many of the events or classes anymore – in the last few years we’ve just turned up for one social dance night only.   I guess we’re getting “over” it a bit.  Plus it’s hard to find babysitting.  Yes – I thought it would get easier when the kids got older, but they just end up with more extra-curricular activities!

We did get out to the Saturday night dance – it was the Hullabaloo Hop in the wonderfully character North Perth Town Hall.   The Hullabaloo Hop is the traditional night when they hold the Jack and Jill competition – basically a social dancing fun competition where entrants get paired up with some other random entrant, and you are judged on how much fun and connection you have with each other.   Entrants wear a number on their back to identify them.   We also had an extra special treat – the local Oz Big Band swung the house with many Basie and other swinging charts!

I took the opportunity to take my new Nikon D700 out for a spin.  Armed with my 50mm f/1.8 and 85mm f/1.8 lenses, and looking forward to using 3200 to 6400 ISOs, I had a ball!  The D700 performed better than I expected – photos even at 6400 ISO were usable with not as much noise as an 1600 ISO image from my old D80.   And there’s something about the D700 sensor – the colours just seem so much nicer.

Here’s a selection of some of the photos from the night!

D700 Unboxing

Finally!

I finally ordered a D700 from T-Dimension a week ago.

And then, as a nerdy nerd, I tracked its progress every hour across the globe..  well, from Hong Kong, to China, to Singapore then to Perth.

And then I waited as it got held up in customs.

And then I rang Fedex, bugging them about why it’s been sitting in Perth for a day without me hearing anything.

And then I decided to drive TO the Fedex depot in Perth, and just demand that I want to pick up my camera.

And after paying the import duty, I had to wait nearly 30 minutes whilst they tried to locate my parcel.

And then it was IN MY HANDS!

Even though I missed out on getting it cheaper, I’m glad I did, because I’ve since found out that many Hong Kong (and probably other) stores have a very small supply of Nikon gear in their inventory, and that’s it – they don’t know when they will get more from Nikon because there’s a worldwide shortage due to the earthquake and tsunami.

After unboxing, the things I immediately noticed:

It was REALLY HEAVY!  I thought, “How am I going to lug this thing around?”  I can’t even hold it with one hand easily!!  I think I nearly strained my wrist holding it with one hand.   Heavy is good for one thing though – it’ll help you steady the camera when hand holding a shot.   Besides that, the only other positive I can think of is it’ll help me burn more calories when I take photos due all the lifting I have to do!

It was BIG!  Well, bigger than the D80 I was using before.  Definitely not inconspicuous at all.  With a small 50mm or 85mm on there, it’s OK.  But I dread to think how big it will be with a 24-70 zoom.  Luckily it still fits into my camera bag.

It felt PRO!  The rubbery texture, the metal housing, the number of buttons and dials.   The lack of “scene” modes like Portrait, Landscape, Sports – that’s right – no more hand-holding.  You need to be comfortable with Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, Program and Manual modes.   And then going through the menus – the sheer number of configurable items – do we need ALL these things to be configurable?

One of the first things I did was put on my 50mm f/1.2 manual non-CPU lens.  Amazingly, the D700 can automatically set exposure for the lens, and although there is no autofocus, the in-focus indicator in the viewfinder works which helps report if the camera thinks the image at the focus point is in focus.  Sweeet!

A more detailed review with some shots to follow…